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10 tips to properly uncork and serve a wine bottle

10 tips to properly uncork and serve a wine bottle

For all wine connoisseurs and lovers, stowing bottles and opening them at the right time is one of the main appeals of enjoying a beverage that evolves over time.

For all wine connoisseurs and lovers, stowing bottles and opening them at the right time is one of the main appeals of enjoying a beverage that evolves over time. After having preserved a wine in perfect conditions, safeguarding them from abrupt temperature changes, environmental humidity and the impact of light, the moment of uncorking and serving shall also be up to such a long-awaited moment.
Below are 10 recommendations to better enjoy the wines we drink at home:

1. If we carefully uncork a wine, it will be possible for us to detect any imperfection that may be present, even before tasting it. When the cork is pulled out, special attention should be paid to the stopper and check whether it is in good condition (without stains or moisture traces) or there are leaks. A cork in good shape is a guarantee for a wine’s optimal preservation conditions.

2. Just like rosé, white and sparkling wines, young reds must be uncorked at the moment of drinking, and automatically serve them. Conversely, we suggest using a decanter in the case of aged reds that have been stowed for a long time. In this case, a decanter is mainly useful to oxygenate a wine, and therefore, awaken the aromas that are sometimes “asleep” after being locked in the bottles. When using decanters is not possible, our advice is to open the bottle at least an hour before serving the wine.

3. Temperatures are also capable of boosting or completely ruining our perception of a given wine. Thus, serving each beverage at the right temperature is crucial, as this aspect directly influences the tasting and the way in which our senses differentiate the peculiar attributes of a red, white or sparkling.

4. If a wine is served at a higher temperature than the recommended one, the quickest and safest way of cooling it would be submerging it in an ice bucket with water, ice and salt for some minutes, as the latter is a conductor of temperature. No matter how impatient we are, wines must never be cooled in the freezer.

5. In the case of whites, rosé and sparklings –drank at a lower temperature than red wines-, our advice is to leave the ice bucket on the table to keep them fresh throughout the meal.

Overall, red wine glasses are bigger, being their goblet’s rim wider than that of white wines, as its aromas and flavours usually need more oxygen to better express themselves.

6. If the wine is too cold to perceive all its attributes, the best option would be to pour a glass and take the goblet with your own hands for some minutes; this way, your body temperature will be conveyed to the beverage through your palms.

7. Beyond their aesthetic appeal, the shape of glasses also helps the wine’s expression to be better perceived. The design was conceived taking into account the way in which the wine enters the mouth and the position of the tasting buds in the tongue. This is why a beverage is way more enjoyed when served in the correct glass.

8. Overall, red wine glasses are bigger, being their goblet’s rim wider than that of white wines, as its aromas and flavours usually need more oxygen to better express themselves. In the case of whites, rims are smaller.

9. At the moment of serving reds, whites or sparklings, the proper measure would be 150 ml, i.e. one third of the glass for still wines, and a full flute glass for sparklings. Hence, a standard bottle (750 ml.) serves 5 wineglasses.

10. If different wines will be tasted during a meal or gathering, it is always important to follow a low-to-high intensity order. This way, fresh and expressive whites should be drank before rounder wines stowed in wood. Likewise, young reds should be tasted before stowage wines. Broadly speaking, the advice is to begin with whites, followed by rosé wines and, finally, reds, so our tasting buds are not overwhelmed.